Composition…………..

When I first started off on this 7mm scale modelling journey I was given a very sound piece of advice. “If you intend modelling a railway in the landscape you are going to need as much width as possible, if you are short of that then keep any buildings and especially trees on the small side”. Those wise words have stuck in my mind ever since I started to construct the layout. So an awful lot of time has been spent on studying the real world, searching out small buildings and other mundane things that are so often taken for granted.

Sometimes I curse the camera for picking out faults and blemishes that the naked eye tends to miss. At other times it is a godsend, especially when testing out new ideas and composing a scene. I usually have a good idea of how I want things to look, but before committing myself I have a dry run. I then take a photo or two from different angles and weigh everything up. More often than not I will tweak things and take photos of the same scene again. Rarely do I get the look that I am after at the first attempt, and at times a complete rethink is called for. Moving a tree or building a couple of inches can make a world of difference, colour and texture also need to be considered. That was the case in the above photo, the creation of a slightly larger gap between the trees on the right, and the hedgerow on the left, opened up a pleasant view of the rolling fields in the background. Whilst the painted hedgerow on the backscene helps create the illusion of depth, the layout being only 21 inches, slightly over 53 cm at this point. As for the colouring, well I am rather pleased with how the backscene blends into the modelled scene.

I think the scene also works when looking from a different angle, sometimes you just get lucky.

It is no secret that an old iron mink van will mask the truncated line as it disappears into the backscene. However I am beginning to wonder if that is necessary, perhaps an area of undergrowth will work better?

I see the unkempt hedgerow continuing to spread behind and to the left of the lamp hut, with brambles forcing their way through the fencing to spill onto the platform. I’m not sure how I will model that but am thinking along the lines of using strands of rubberized horsehair and odd bits of seamoss. Whatever material I use needs to be fairly open, to allow glimpses of the fields and hedgerows on the backscene

1455 has returned from the paint shop after being given an overall coat of grime, along with some soot and ash stains. I’ll be adding a few more subtle weathering touches myself in due course. Like 7416 she awaits the addition of some tools, shovels, a bucket and crew. I also need to weather the 16T mineral, but won’t be going overboard as such wagons were relatively new in the era that I am modelling.

Geoff

19 thoughts on “Composition…………..

  1. ‘As for the colouring, well I am rather pleased with how the backscene blends into the modelled scene.’
    Your patience in developing the painted backscene has paid is volumes Geoff. The new header photograph really captures the imagination of a backwater terminus with distant views across the Marches.
    There is a photo of a train standing in Fairford with the loco crew sat on the station bench taking a few minutes break prior to departure (from the excellent resource ‘The Fairford Branch Line’). I imagine the crew of 1455 enjoying a similar experience!
    http://www.fairfordbranch.co.uk/Fairford.htm

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Hi Paul,

      Thanks for your comments and the link to the excellent Fairford site. The backscene really tried my patience at times but I’m glad that I persevered with it now.

      Geoff

      Like

  2. “… sometimes you just get lucky.”

    I don’t believe that for a minute! I put it down to a really good eye and a whole lot of modelling skill Geoff! I really do like that distant view in the first picture, it all works so seemlessly. The view in every other picture is rather good too!

    I’m afraid I have no suggestion on what to do with the truncated line – my modelling ‘imagination’ is nowhere near a match for yours!

    It’s a real shame that the ‘spammers’ can’t find something more constructive to do with their lives!

    Keith

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you Keith,

      Oh believe me luck does come into play Keith, sometimes things just work in a way that I never expected without any effort at all. At other times I struggle to get things how I want them, and then trial, error and patience is the name of the game. As for my modelling imagination, well I pick most of my ideas up from observing the real world, and viewing photos in books and magazines.

      On a different note you can view any photo here on the blog full size. Just scroll down to the end of the post you are reading, and you will see a gallery featuring every photo that appears in that particular post. Left click on any photo and it will appear as part of a slideshow. Look at the bottom right of your screen and you will see a circle with an exclamation mark, click on that and the number of the photo will appear in the bottom centre of your screen. You will see a tab marked view full size, click on that and Bobs your uncle. If you want to see how rough my modelling is then click on the photo again and you can zoom in. πŸ™‚

      Geoff

      Liked by 1 person

  3. Geoff, I do hope the ongoing dilemma with spam does not dissuade you from continuing your blog, which is such a delight. Your musings and genuine sharing of information is a credit to you and provides a veritable treasure trove of considered ideas and learning for us readers.
    Re your reflective question on the truncated siding. If I might throw in an idea, what about the option of a neglected buffer stop just peeing through the overgrowth? A restrained effect and not too clichΓ©d of course.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Well thank you very much for your kind words, which are very much appreciated. I am pleased that you and other readers find my witterings of interest. πŸ™‚

      In fairness, WordPress do a pretty good job of filtering out the spam, but sometimes genuine comments are filtered out as well. So I end up checking through it all to make sure nothing genuine has ended up in the spam folder. I have been in touch with WordPress about the problem in the past, only to be told that the more popular the blog the more spam traffic they attract. According to them the solution is simple, just upgrade your blog and pay for it, rather than rely on the basic free software.

      Your suggestion of a neglected buffer stop was considered at the early planning stages, but I asked myself if the expense of one would have been justified, seeing as the branch was on its last legs? Nevertheless I did try the idea out, but it needed something behind it to make a near seamless transition into the backscene. Hence the idea of an old van, which would have been a cheap option, and could be part hidden amongst some small saplings etc, etc.

      However after yesterdays experiments I came up with the idea of a heap of old ballast, some would obviously have been left behind when the redundant track was removed, so why not use it as a sort of sand drag behind the timber baulks that are currently in place. Some tall weeds could be planted into its surface and around it, so far things are looking good, but I will leave it in place for the rest of the week before deciding if it is the way to go.

      Geoff

      Like

    1. Neither have I, if I took a ‘holier than thou approach and looked down on others then I could understand it. But I’m not like that at all and just appreciate good modelling in whatever scale or gauge. Over the course of the last twelve months 627 spam comments have been received, I guess I’m just popular πŸ™‚

      Geoff

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Hi Jamie, good to hear from you, I trust all is well at Kashmir Cottage? All I can say is that I’m in good company when it comes to receiving spam:-) You are probably right about it being automated. Most of it appears to be Russian going by the text, don’t know what I have done to upset Putin:-)

        Geoff

        Like

  4. It is hard to tell real-world perspectives from photos, but do you need anything 3D at all to mask the truncated line? Perhaps just darken a part of the backscene? Or, if you could execute it, a wagon end painted on the backscene.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I think painting a wagon end is a bit beyond me James, but I did consider using part of a kit in the form of a van end. I could probably get away with that in 4mm scale, but not in the larger scale which is less forgiving. Camera angles also have to be considered, and that is something I have been investigating this afternoon whilst mocking up some undergrowth, my experiments so far point to 3D being the best option.

      Geoff

      Liked by 1 person

  5. β€œIt is no secret that an old iron mink van will mask the truncated line as it disappears into the backscene. However I am beginning to wonder if that is necessary, perhaps an area of undergrowth will work better?”

    I think this question shows the value of your approach. I know it is a reflective comment and entirely your choice so my opinion should not carry any weight, but I agree – but a limited amount of undergrowth, perhaps just enough to link between 3D and 2D?

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Your opinions always carry weight, I just wish more readers would join in and offer their own:-) That is the whole idea of allowing comments, but sadly genuine ones continue to be outnumbered by spam. The score this week is 17 -2 in favour of the spam merchants.

      I have since been mocking up the scene with some scraps of scenic material and yes the idea does work and looks much better than having a van parked there. The ‘less can mean more’ approach shows its value yet again!

      Geoff

      Liked by 1 person

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