Station Building Pt2………….

The last time the station building appeared in these pages it had received a base coat of paint and was ready for a little weathering. That job is now complete with several sheets of corrugated iron having been dry brushed with mixes of Precision paints dirty black, weathered wood and Humbrol matt leather and dark earth enamels. Sap green acrylic was dry brushed where water stains might have formed around drain pipes, and along the bottom of the building. I worked the various weathering process up gently, doing a little at a time and then taking a step back to look at things again before proceeding. I’m not one for heavy weathering, preferring a more subtle approach which I feel looks far more realistic. Rainwater goods were painted in Humbrol chocolate enamel, and then given a dusting of talcum powder to create a weatherworn, faded appearance.

A stove pipe chimney was added above the waiting room, and a simpler one above the ticket office and store. Door frames were made from basswood strip, and painted with a mix of Precision weathered wood and Humbrol matt white enamel, most of the latter being rubbed away to create a weatherworn neglected appearance. As an experiment I made the window frames from styrene, rather than the self adhesive labels as used for the goods yard huts. I felt that something with a better defined relief detail was needed for a building that would take centre stage on the layout. I did take a look at various cast resin, and lasercut window frames but couldn’t find anything of the correct size. Three different sizes of frame were needed, two identical 4 pane frames for the front of the building, a slightly smaller one for the end elevation and an even small one of a completely different style for the WC.

The frames are rather flimsy until they are built up with the various overlays, but once the solvent has set they are strong enough to be cleaned up with files. Glazing was from clear PTEC sheet, glued in place with Canopy Glue.

With the window frames installed I took a selection of photos to see how the building looked prior to adding poster boards, and continuing with the weathering.

The S&T department has been busy preparing the building for a connection to the rest of the railway system. Once the scenery has been completed then the lines and wiring will be connected, to do so at this stage of the build would only result in them being damaged.

The corrugated sheeting has been deliberately distressed in hope of creating an air of neglect. Poster boards were constructed from styrene sheet to match the size of the Tiny Signs posters. The WC glazing was sprayed with ‘Testors Dull Coat’ to make it appear opaque. More grass and weeds are needed on the platform surface, I mentioned in a previous post how I see an unkempt hedgerow spilling over, and through the fence onto the platform. A couple of enamel advertising signs will appear on the fencing, along with some fire buckets which are currently being painted. Though I suspect the powers that be would be more than happy to see the building burn to the ground. Etched drain covers from MSE have been let into the platform surface below each downpipe, not that you can easily see them.

Both the doors and their frames have hardly any paint left on them. To be honest two dodgy tins of enamel paint was the cause of that. For despite plenty of stirring both doors ended up in a horrid, tacky, gloss mess, which still hadn’t dried after a week! Normally a light dusting of talcum powder would have acted as a matting agent, and salvaged the situation, but on this occasion the dodge didn’t work. So there was nothing I could do other than strip the doors back to plain styrene, and start all over again with a different type and shade of paint.

I did plan to return to working on the scenery next, but will be turning my attention to painting and weathering some goods wagons, and completing the platelayers hut.

The first train to call………………….

A quiet spell at an all but deserted Bleddfa Road.

Geoff

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11 thoughts on “Station Building Pt2………….

  1. Lots of good videos on the technique (and other oil paint ones) on Youtube too Geoff, personally I fnd it easier to warch and learn a technique these days, my attention span must be shrinking! An armour modeller named ‘Nightshift’ produces some brilliant weathering!

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      1. No chance of that Keith, though I do appreciate the workmanship and brilliant ideas that the armour and military modellers use. At times I can’t understand why railway modellers lag behind them when it comes to trying new materials and techniques. A typical reaction from some of my friends is, ” you spent what on paints and scenic materials, you could have bought another loco for that”!

        I rest my case:-)

        Geoff

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  2. More lovely modelling Geoff, the layout is really coming together now and everything looks just how I imagine a slightly run down railway byline should – the atmosphere is just magic! I really do like the station approach for some reason!

    Hope you and yours are keeping well.

    Keith

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    1. Hi Keith and thanks for your kind comments:-)

      The station approach hits the right notes for me as well, and will hopefully look a little better as I work it up.

      We are still surviving here and just getting on with things as near normal as we can, hope all is well in your neck of the woods as well.

      Geoff

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      1. Yes thanks Geoff, touch wood all good at the mo, keeping calm and carrying on!

        In regards Lifecolor paint and talc, I’ve never tried that, but I get similar fading effects on acrylic paints using weathering pigments or artists pastels, or the latest fashion is oil paint ‘rendering’ using small dots of tube oil paint blended into the surface using either a dry brush or a brush slightly dampened in white spirit. This can give some superbly realistic results.

        Keith

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    1. The talcum powder is best applied when the paint has almost gone off and just tacky enough for the powder to adhere. Iain Rice described the technique in one of his many articles in MRJ, and calls it ‘pouncing’. I always use Johnsons baby powder which raises a few eyebrows when we go shopping for fresh supplies:-) Not only does the powder act as a matting agent, but it also blends the colours together, it leaves your models smelling rather nice as well:-)

      At the moment I am switching over to ‘Lifecolor’ acrylic paints and weathering pigments, because the current range of enamels from both Precision and Humbrol are too unpredictable. Sometimes you might get a tin full of thinners rather than paint, or a tin of thick gunge, and at other times the colour is nothing like the shade it is supposed to be, and that is despite endless stirring. The Lifecolor acrylics that I have tried to date have given me a really flat, matt finish, and yes they do have a range of railway colours which can be found in their camouflage range. I doubt that talc. will be needed, or work with them but I’m open to experimentation πŸ™‚

      Geoff

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