A Touch Of March Madness…….

Well spring seems to have finally sprung in these parts, and once again I face the annual juggling act of finding time for modelling, whilst dealing with the distractions of gardening, fence painting and other chores. Just how I found time for work before I retired I will never know. So my modelling bench is now becoming rather cluttered with half completed modelling projects. I can’t seem to help myself because I find it hard to see a project through from beginning to end without being distracted by others. Take the cottage for example which is now nearing completion, had I not run out of styrene sheet then the doors and their frames would have been installed along with the windows. Some roof slates would have been laid and I would most likely have been working on the cottage outbuildings. Unfortunately whilst awaiting fresh supplies of styrene sheet and other sundries, I found myself digging out my old Westdale Diag. E147 coach kit, and surprise, surprise after three years in store I’ve actually made a start on it! But before we go there lets take a look at the cottage………

The rear elevation is being modelled in a sorry state of repair, inspiration coming from a public house close to our Welsh bolthole. The front of the building is in pristine condition, but all manner of modifications and bodge like repairs have been carried out around the back. To create something like that it is sometimes necessary to make a right mess of things, in times past I might have given up and consigned the model to the scrap bin. But experience has since taught me to persevere, to look beyond any mess and see the job through.

After a coat of plaster the stonework, bricks and render began to blend together and look much better,. The lintel over the door is meant to represent a piece of seasoned oak, as for the chimney, l am at a loss to explain why it should look wonky in the photo, as it is near perfectly true, but you will have to take my word for that!

After a little sanding down and the addition of barge boards the cottage is beginning to look like the building that I see in my minds eye. The card ​perimeter wall is just a mock up at the moment, a wash house and outside loo will be built into it, if I feel that it looks right then I will make a proper job of it. I imagine drinking water being brought up to the station in churns, as it was to Titley Junction before it arrived by means of a converted 6-wheeled milk tanker. Alas I have no room to stable one of those so the locals will have to make do with churns. Mains electric would most likely be absent as well, so no doubt the inhabitants of the cottage would be kept busy trimming the wicks of oil lamps, and cutting logs for the fires. Though the odd lump of coal would probably have been dropped by friendly fireman from passing trains.

Window frames will be in white, and like the remainder of the woodwork the colours are similar to those used on the actual building. Doors will be simple planked affairs in keeping with the rustic nature of the cottage.

This photo shows the cottage in relation to the station, I like to think everything sits well together and captures a feeling of a place well off the beaten track. I am certainly happy with the open nature of the scene. The railcar will eventually have a darker soot stained roof, and those wiper blades will be toned down. In the background 4600 can just be seen beyond the goods shed, she now has a new early crest.

Here she is all ready for a spot of light weathering, heaven knows when I will get around to that with so many projects on the go! It really is surprising how such a small layout can keep you busy.

So what of the Diag. E147 coach, well I was going to refer you back to an earlier post but the link doesn’t work as intended. So to recap here is a selection of photos showing its component parts………………

The instructions comprise of three drawings and a brief note explaining the kit manufacturers suggested method of assembly. The model is very similar to a Comet coach kit, but features a one piece pre formed aluminium body shell, and a wooden floor, rather than brass sides and underframe

The wooden floor and aluminium sole bars have to be cut to length, and the position of the underframe detail has to be marked out on floor with reference to the dimensions provided on the drawing. Holes for the bogie mountings also have to be marked out and drilled, it might all sound rather difficult but it is easy enough. At the moment I just have the brake linkages and ‘V’ hangers to fit, and then the second solebar and truss rods will be fitted to complete the underframe. The latter isn’t secured to the body in the above photo hence the gap at the brake end. You can just make out a seat which has been glued with epoxy on to the passenger compartment end on the far left. This acts as a body mounting into which the underframe floor, complete buffer beam is screwed, a piece of half round wood moulding is attached to the brake end to act as the other mount.

The ends fit slightly recessed within the body, and are then filed back flush with the body sides to create the lip of the roof. The instructions tell you to glue the ends in with Evo-Stick, and once dry to run a fillet of epoxy around the inside of the joints. I had my reservations about that given the gauge of the aluminium, but the method works well and results in a strong job. Pilot holes are ready drilled for the roof vents, door handles and grab rails, but I will have to mark and drill holes for the door hinges and alarm gear, which I will order from along with decent buffers, vac./ steam pipes and screw couplings from CPL Products

https://www.cplproducts.net/about-cpl.html.

Once the underframe is complete the seats, and compartment partitions can be fitted to its upper side. More updates will follow as I continue the build, which is proving to be very enjoyable.

Geoff

13 thoughts on “A Touch Of March Madness…….

  1. This style of model, set in the countryside is among my favorites! Glad to hear you are getting going again 🙂

    Studying your pictures as always to try and encapsulate some of that beautiful carefree would while also taking inspiration towards my own model railway which is only just getting started with a revised trackplan.

    Keep us updated!

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    1. Thanks for your comments Jim and good luck with your plans for your own model railway. 🙂

      Geoff

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    1. Thanks Paul, the idea of the infill came from Gordon Gravett, now his scribed brick infill is indeed superb. My effort is still very much a case of work in progress.

      I’m pleased that I have managed to fire your imagination and look forward to seeing where your thoughts lead you.

      Geoff

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    1. Thank you for your comment James that is very kind of you.

      I am a frequent visitor to your own blog and also enjoy your articles in MRJ.

      Geoff

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      1. It’s my pleasure!

        I saw you’re having radiotherapy – my dad underwent the same treatment for the same reason about four years ago now. He’s still around, fitter and healthier than ever!

        I hope it goes well – I’m hoping I’m coming across as supportive l positive though I fear I might not be coming across well at the moment.

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      2. You come across just fine James so no worries there, thank you 🙂

        It is good to know that your dad is doing well and I wish him and yourself well. I finished my radiotherapy early in the New Year, though I won’t know how successful the treatment has been until July. But my oncologist is confident that I will be fine 🙂

        Take care,
        Geoff

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      3. Good morning James,

        The waiting isn’t really bothering me which might seem strange, but I’m just taking each day as it comes and getting on with life.

        Modelling is indeed good for your health, though up until a few weeks ago I tired easily and found it hard to concentrate, so I found myself plotting and planning rather than beavering away at my workbench:-)

        Geoff

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    1. Thank you Simon that works fine, the problem is down to the original post being made with the Classic Editor rather than the Block Editor which I am now forced to use. It should be possible to convert the post but obviously WordPress need to tweak their software as the conversion doesn’t work, I won’t being holding my breath whilst they sort that one out 🙂

      Geoff

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